CONTROL

EVALUATION

Evaluation of systems consists of inspection of the situation followed by decisions.

Evaluation begins with inspection of the situation within which systems are operating. The first stage in inspection is identification of all of the possible topics and issues associated with them that may affect the process or system.The second stage is to select which of these topics and issues that have been identified are relevant. The sequence and timing of the selection and evaluation are important elements of selection. The third stage is the measurement of the performance of the selected topics. These measures may range from counting the production of cans of beans to assessing the morale of the staff, or judging the confidence of the stock market in the shares of the company. The fourth stage is the comparison of the selected measurement with similar measurement made elsewhere. These comparisons may be between the same topics at different times or in different places. Production of a factory during a certain time may be compared with production of the same factory at some other time, or with some other factory elsewhere.

EVALUATION

Goldilocks evaluated the situation, and inspected the room. She identified her problem of hunger and her objective of satisfying it. The resources were three bowls of porridge of which she wished to eat one. She selected, measured, and compared them before making the decision to eat the one that was 'just right'.

EVALUATION

Evaluation is only possible if the attributes and performance of the activities, resources, connections between them and controls are known. It is then necessary to compare these with other similar resources and activities in other systems, or compare them with those in the same system at some other time.

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